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COOKIES for the x-mas tree?

COOKIES for the x-mas tree? Topic: Crafts made with brown paper bags
June 17, 2019 / By Ananias
Question: Hey, can anybody get me the recipe for that kind of cookies for the x-mas tree? but, plz use simple words, 'coz i don't talk much english, i really thank you all! Sorry about my english, i'm better talking than writting, lol xoxoxo
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Best Answers: COOKIES for the x-mas tree?

Toria Toria | 6 days ago
Here is a recipe for ornaments for the tree. They are NOT edible! CINNAMON APPLESAUCE ORNAMENTS 1 cup ground cinnamon 1 tablespoon ground cloves 1 tablespoon ground nutmeg 3/4 cup applesauce 2 tablespoons craft glue Blend together cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg. Stir in applesauce and glue. Knead dough until smooth (about 2 minutes). Divide dough into 4 portions. Roll out each portion to 1/4" thickness. Cut with cookie cutters. Using a drinking straw, punch out a hole in each "cookie" for hanging. Place ornaments on racks or brown paper bags to dry for several days. Turn ornaments daily so they will dry evenly. Makes 12 Ornaments P.S. Children love making these!
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Toria Originally Answered: Could I replace Kashi cookies for the Smart for Life cookies and still get amazing weight loss results?
NO, absolutely not. I have also done some research I will share with you. First off, Smart For Life Cookies are natural and 60% organic. Smart For cookies contain just 2.5 grams of total fat, where Kashi contain 4.5 total fat grams. Smart For Life cookies contain 15 grams of carbs, while Kashi contains 20 grams of carbs . Smart For Life cookies contain a total of 5 grams of sugar. Kashi contains 7 grams of sugar. Smart For Life cookies contain 6 grams of protein, which is almost 3xs the amount of protein found in Kashi cookies. Kashi contains just 2 grams of protein. Smart For Life cookies are not just a snack. Clinical studies have shown that each Smart For Life cookie works as a hunger suppressing meal replacement, which is rich in Omega 3 fatty acids,plant sterols, and Hero fiber. Each Smart For Life cookie contains just 100-110 calories per serving , while Kashi cookies contain 130 calories per cookie or serving . Individuals using Smart For Life as a diet program can expect to lose anywhere from 10-15 pounds within a 4week time frame.
Toria Originally Answered: Could I replace Kashi cookies for the Smart for Life cookies and still get amazing weight loss results?
beware of fat free or zero trans fats foods as you could be trading fats for huge amounts of sugar or sodium

Rylee Rylee
You can use the pre-packaged Pillsbury sugar cookie dough(its in the refridgerator case, by the cheese and biscuits) Cut them out with cookie cutters, and bake them just a little longer than it calls for on the package, and about 25 degrees lower. Decorate as desired.
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Nerine Nerine
****Christmas Cutout Sugar Cookies 4 cups sifted all-purpose flour 2 teaspoons baking powder 1 1/2 cups sugar 2 eggs 3/4 cup butter (1 1/2 sticks) 2 teaspoons vanilla extract Colored Icing, recipe follows Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. In a bowl, stir together flour and baking powder. In another bowl, beat butter with sugar until fluffy and light. Beat in eggs and vanilla. Stir in flour mixture, a third at a time to make a stiff dough. Divide dough into 4 pieces. Roll out a portion of cookie dough to 1/4 inch thick. Cut out shapes using cookie cutters. Place on lightly greased or nonstick cookie sheets. Bake until lightly golden, about 10 minute, rotating baking sheet halfway through cooking time. Cool completely on pans about 5 minutes, transfer to cooling racks and cool completely before decorating. Colored Icing: 1/2 cup confectioners’ sugar 1 1/2 tablespoons water 3 to 4 drops food coloring, plus more as needed Colored sprinkles, optional In a small bowl, mix sugar and water to form a thick, smooth icing. Stir in food coloring to reach desired shade. Drop icing onto cookies using a small teaspoon and smooth with the back of the spoon. Make additional bowls for additional colors. Additional multi-colored sprinkles can be added on top of icing before it dries for more decorative cookies, if desired. A viewer, who may not be a professional cook, provided this recipe. The Food Network Kitchens chefs have not tested this recipe and therefore, we cannot make representation as to the results. ****Holiday Cookie Projects: Snowflakes, Dreidel Trios, and Ornaments 8 ounces (2 sticks) unsalted butter, slightly softened 3/4 cup light brown sugar, packed 1 egg 1/2 cup dark molasses (not blackstrap) 1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract 3 1/4 cups cake flour 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 1/4 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 2 teaspoons ground ginger 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves For decorating: 4 cups confectioners' sugar 6 tablespoons milk 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract Food coloring Colored sugar Cream the butter in a mixer fitted with a paddle attachment (or using a hand mixer) until smooth. Add the sugar and mix. Add the egg and mix. Add the molasses and vanilla and mix. Sift the flour, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, ginger, and cloves together. Working in batches, and mixing just until combined after each addition, add the dry ingredients to the butter-sugar mixture. Shape the dough into a thick disk, wrap in waxed paper, and refrigerate 1 to 2 hours. Heat the oven to 350 degrees F. Grease 1 or 2 sheet pans. On a lightly floured surface, roll the dough out 1/4-inch thick. Icing decorations: Stir the confectioners' sugar, milk, and vanilla together until smooth. To make snowflakes: Use a snowflake-shaped cookie cutter to cut out the cookies, rerolling the scraps as needed. If you plan to hang the cookies, use a toothpick to make the holes in the dough about 1/8-inch wide, keeping in mind that the holes will shrink as the cookies bake. Bake until firm, 12 to 15 minutes, and let cool on the pan. Using only white icing and a pastry bag fitted with the smallest plain tip, pipe thin lines from the center of the cookie out to the points, like spokes of a wheel. Connect the spokes with thin lines in between them, making a spiderweb effect to make it look like a snowflake. Let the icing harden before threading the cookies onto wire, string or yarn for hanging. To make dreidel trios: Use a dreidel cookie cutter and cut out 3 cookies. Lay 1 on a greased sheet pan. Fanning out at an angle, with the handles overlapping at the top, lay 2 more dreidels next to the first one (it will look like a paper-doll effect). The handle is now 3 layers thick; press on it gently to thin it slightly and make it larger. Repeat with the remaining dough, rerolling the scraps as needed. If you plan to hang the cookies, use a toothpick to make a hole in the handle about 1/8-inch wide, keeping in mind that the hole will shrink as the cookies bake. Bake until firm, 12 to 15 minutes, and let cool on the pan. Color some of your icing blue with food coloring, or use blue colored sugar and white icing together. Using a pastry bag fitted with a small plain tip, pipe Hebrew letters or stars of David on the cookies' faces. Sprinkle the sugar on the icing while the icing is still wet. Let the icing harden before threading the cookies onto wire, string, or yarn for hanging. To make ornaments: Use any holiday-themed cookie cutter to cut out the cookies, rerolling the scraps as needed. If you plan to hang the cookies, use a toothpick to make holes in the dough about 1/8 inch wide, keeping in mind that the holes will shrink as the cookies bake. Bake until firm, 12 to 15 minutes, and let cool on the pan. Meanwhile, color some of your icing in festive colors with food coloring, or use colored sugars. Using a pastry bag fitted with the smallest plain tip, pipe a few colorful borders and decorations on the cookies. When set, add more lines of icing in white. Let the icing harden before threading the cookies onto wire, string, or yarn for hanging.
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Nerine Originally Answered: How many fortune cookies would it have to buy to learn the whole chinese language?
This is a complex question. You need to know 3000 characters (or ideograms) to read the Chinese newspaper, but Chinese has way more than 3000 words, you need to know combinations of ideograms. A well-known 12-volume reference Chinese dictionary lists over 370,000 different word definitions, but I don't think you would find all of them in fortune cookies! A common 1-volume dictionary lists about 80,000 different words in Chinese (and 11,000 ideograms). Now back to your question: you would then need to open at least that many different cookies to learn Chinese, but assuming that you are going to the restaurant and getting cookies randomly, this is a different probabilistic problem : how many cookies would you need to open on average to sample all the Chinese words? The answer is way way more than that, because you will most likely pick up the same word several times over. The precise answer is probably meaningless.

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