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Can't Remember The Name of This Book.?

Can't Remember The Name of This Book.? Topic: Distant writing a book
June 17, 2019 / By Clayton
Question: My class was reading this way back in middle school, and we never finished it. anyhow from what i can remember it took place in the future where books didn't exist anymore or something like that and people could inject books into their mind to be played like movies. Also the main character would get the smell of lightning before he would have a seizure. Hope this is enough info for you guys to help me.
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Best Answers: Can't Remember The Name of This Book.?

Amos Amos | 9 days ago
The Last Book in the Universe by Rodman Philbrick After an earthquake has destroyed much of the planet, an epileptic teenager nicknamed Spaz begins the heroic fight to bring human intelligence back to the Earth of a distant future. In this riveting futuristic novel, Spaz, a teenage boy with epilepsy, makes a dangerous journey in the company of an old man and a young boy. The old man, Ryter, one of the few people remaining who can read and write, has dedicated his life to recording stories. Ryter feels a kinship with Spaz, who unlike his contemporaries has a strong memory; because of his epilepsy, Spaz cannot use the mind probes that deliver entertainment straight to the brain and rot it in the process. Nearly everyone around him uses probes to escape their life of ruin and poverty, the result of an earthquake that devastated the world decades earlier. Only the "proovs," genetically improved people, have grass, trees, and blue skies in their aptly named Eden, inaccessible to the "normals" in the Urb.
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Amos Originally Answered: Do you remember Smokey the Bear?
Yes, I remember Smokey quite well. He has always been a great friend of the forest and he has done a good job. What little kid in the past fifty years didn't listen to what Smoke had to say ? Little kids grow up to be big kids and they all remember what Smokey taught them years earlier.
Amos Originally Answered: Do you remember Smokey the Bear?
Of course I remember Smokey the Bear!!! Every weekend when I was a kid with my family we would go camping...There was a big bill board as you enter the campground of him saying just that. It's still there a little faded but still there.
Amos Originally Answered: Do you remember Smokey the Bear?
Smokey The Bear and Smokey Bear are the same bear lol yes we had stuffed Smokey push his badge and he said"only you can prevent forrest fires" Now he has a whole new persona on my space and youtube. Not so hot..

Tony Tony
hotel Larry? no longer as sought after by way of fact the Golden Compass, Larry the polar undergo had saved the lady's father's existence, and to pay off him, the father offered a hotel with an exceptionally chilly pool and that all of them stay jointly there. good day i'd be good! They bypass to the zoo sometime and discover Larry's brother, so as that they sneak Larry's brother and yet another polar undergo out of the zoo and invite them back to the hotel for dinner and a swim.
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Tony Originally Answered: Remember, this is not me saying some wild things?
The beginning of the quotation, "Evolution is a fairy tale for adults" is not from Bounoure but from Jean Rostand, a much more famous French biologist (he was a member of the Academy of Sciences of the French Academy). The precise quotation is as follows: "Transformism is a fairy tale for adults." (Age Nouveau, [a French periodical] February 1959, p. 12). But Rostand has also written that "Transformism may be considered as accepted, and no scientist, no philosopher, no longer discusses [questions - ED.] the fact of evolution." (L'Evolution des Especes [i.e., The Evolution of the Species], Hachette, p. 190). Jean Rostand was ... an atheist. The [end] of the quotation of Professor Bounoure to which you allude is taken from his book, Determinism and Finality, edited by Flammarion, 1957, p. 79. The precise quotation is the following: "That, by this, evolutionism would appear as a theory without value, is confirmed also pragmatically. A theory must not be required to be true, said Mr. H. Poincare, more or less, it must be required to be useable. Indeed, none of the progress made in biology depends even slightly on a theory, the principles of which [i.e., of how evolution occurs -- ED.] are nevertheless filling every year volumes of books, periodicals, and congresses with their discussions and their disagreements." [Obviously, Bounoure was expressing his distaste at those in his day who argued over the "principles" of evolution, "how" it took place, whether via Lamarckian or Darwinian "evolutionism." Bounoure probably thought that such "principles" were not worth all the "discussions and disagreements" since they were not well understood, were yet to be discovered, and perhaps might not be discovered, i.e., if supernatural intervention into the evolutionary process was accepted. Bounoure was a theist. He also probably thought that more practical scientific investigations needed to be pursued and less "discussions and disagreements." - ED.] As far as we know, Louis Bounoure never served as ["Director" nor was even] a member of the CNRS. He was a professor of biology at the University of Strasbourg. Bounoure was a Christian but did not affirm that Genesis was to be taken to the letter. He expressed his ideas in his work. He is clearly "finalist" and against all contingent visions of evolution. ["Finalism" is a philosophical term related to a belief in ultimate purpose or design behind everything, including, in this case, the evolution of the cosmos and of life. - ED.] He bases his views, among other things, on the existence of elements that are pre-adapted for their future functions.
Tony Originally Answered: Remember, this is not me saying some wild things?
This is a Kent Hovind quote, Kent is currently serving a 10-year prison sentence for massive tax fraud. Additionally, this "Director" doesn't exist. I know BECAUSE I CHECKED. I didn't just parrot some lies I hear from a guy who is in prison for lying. Lie #315. E.T. Babinski actually contacted French authorities. They revealed that Louis Bounoure never served as Director or even a member of the CNRS. He was a professor of biology at the University of Strasbourg. Bounoure was a Christian but did not affirm that Genesis was to be taken to the letter. The beginning of the quotation, "Evolution is a fairy tale for adults" is not from Bounoure but adapted from Jean Rostand, a member of the Academy of Sciences of the French Academy. Rostand also wrote that "Transformism may be considered as accepted, and no scientist, no philosopher, no longer discusses the fact of evolution." (L'Evolution des Especes [i.e., The Evolution of the Species], Hachette, p. 190). The end of Bounoure's quotation is from his book, "Determinism and Finality." It runs, "That, by this, evolutionism would appear as a theory without value, is confirmed also pragmatically. A theory must not be required to be true, said Mr. H. Poincare, more or less, it must be required to be useable. Indeed, none of the progress made in biology depends even slightly on a theory, the principles of which are nevertheless filling every year volumes of books, periodicals, and congresses with their discussions and their disagreements." In other words, Hovind's quote is complete fiction and he is too incompetent and dishonest to correct it or even check up on it.

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